8 thoughts on “88 MIKE

      1. I trained in Fort Gordon, GA. It was fun until the climbing up on telephone poles. The qualifiers for the 45 and 90 foot poles I was too afraid to do. Too many people fell, got injured. Got injured on the 30′- that was enough for me. Pulled through the radio and cable sections. Never went to Iraq but my brother was in the Gulf war. I missed that cause I was pregnant. However, you’ve been in the longest war in the history of America. And the VA is struggling to give better benefits than those if my era (Cold War) and the Vietnam War vets. Good to meet another veteran brother in arms! Go Army – we’re the best of the best! We’re Army strong ๐Ÿ’ช.

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      2. Army strong!! Yes, indeed! The VA has been pretty harsh to me these last few years and I even work at one. 2 tours to Iraq as a truck driver on countless convoys and they say I don’t have PTSD when I live with the issues every day. Anywho, thanks for reading it. It’s awesome we can relate on these Army topics ๐Ÿ˜„

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      3. Oh, I know what you mean. I’ve been fighting for my benefits since 1998 and now I’m 100%TDIU, 90% combined. Time after time had to appeal, went to the BVA, back to My RO and next thing you know they cheated me somewhere and I’m filing again. My brother is 100% for PTSD so you can get it too! I encourage you to subscribe thru Hadit. come for their weekly podcasts – their website is truckloads of information even relevant for your PTSD and what they expect at the C&P exams. Keep on them, even though the runaround, you’ll come across people who are willing to help you along!

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    1. Thank you for your support! Yeah, I’ve been in the Army National Guard for the last 15 years. Been to Iraq twice back when the war started and again when they were pulling troops out. I learned that fear is relative, really. You’d be surprised how you can adjust to living in a warzone. You just accept the fact that you’re in one and anything can happen. Just remember your training and hope for the best. You become numb to the idea of dying. Keeps you sane while you’re there. They don’t teach you how to turn that numbness off when you get back though. That’s the scary part.

      Sorry for getting so serious ๐Ÿ˜… Thanks for stopping by, Bailey!

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